Goodbye USA

Oct. 23rd, 2014 03:11 pm
yvi: Kaylee half-smiling, looking very pretty (Default)
[personal profile] yvi
At Las Vegas airport. The flight is scheduled to leave in 1.5 hours and arrive in Germany at 13 o'clock local time. I have lots of music, a good book (still reading Ancillary Justice) and three movies downloaded to my cell phone via Google Play Music. Still, I hope to sleep a bit on the first half of the flight to make the jet lag a bit more bearable.

Protection

Oct. 23rd, 2014 03:52 pm
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Posted by Claudia Rebaza

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Increasingly, fandom is coming into the public view — not just because of its creative energy, but because of its perceived value to creators, producers, and marketers. Your support helps the OTW advocate for fandom as a free space separate from commercial interests.

Various creative industries are courting fans, but not always with an understanding of or concern for fans' own interests. Fans are more than free labor, and fanworks are more than a potential new revenue source.

The Organization for Transformative Works was formed as a response to experience with too many services that proved vulnerable to commercial exploitation and control, or even to disappearance, without concern for the fans who’d built communities using those services. The OTW has long maintained the stance that fandom should be an empowered space for its members, which means that there should be fandom spaces that are free of commercial exploitation, influence, and control. Diversity gives us strength, and that diversity includes preserving noncommercial fanworks. From our mission statement: "We are proactive and innovative in protecting and defending our work from commercial exploitation and legal challenge."

One way we do that is through the work of our Legal committee in advocating for fans and liberal interpretations of fair use where fanwork is concerned. We also work to protect transformative creators, whether it's through giving individual fans advice about how to deal with copyright and other legal issues; through participation in conversations on copyright law and the DMCA; through warning fans about potentially exploitative scenarios; or through offering fans information and answering questions.

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October 23rd, 2014next

October 23rd, 2014: GETTING SO EXCITED FOR HALLOWE'EN, you guys. I carved a pumpkin! I called my carving, "Um, Actually, The Constitution-Class Enterprise Never Canonically Encountered The Collective".

– Ryan

Free Speech

Oct. 22nd, 2014 04:02 pm
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Posted by Claudia Rebaza

English

Banner with seven circles and a megaphone in the fourth one, reading 'Seven Years, Seven Wonders, Organization for Transformative Works, October 19-26 2014 Membership Drive'

The Organization for Transformative Works stands for transformative works in all their colors. Because we are supported by donations from fans like you, the OTW's many projects are able to remain entirely censorship-free. This means that the OTW supports fannish works and preserves the history of fan culture without worrying about external cultural pressures.

Fanworks hosted on the Archive of Our Own range from fluffy and cheerful to dark and gritty to steamy and sexy to thoughtful and eloquent (and some are all of the above!).

Fans don't need to fear that their works might be purged from AO3 in order to make the site more attractive to advertisers. As we said yesterday, because we depend on fans and not advertisers to fund our hosting costs, the Archive can remain fully independent and accept as many fannish works as the servers can hold.

This was a fundamental tenet of the OTW. When writing AO3's terms of service, we aimed for maximum inclusivity because we wanted to create a space that wasn’t limited by commercial considerations. In it we state, "You understand that using the Archive may expose you to material that is offensive, triggering, erroneous, sexually explicit, indecent, blasphemous, objectionable, grammatically incorrect, or badly spelled." The Archive has works representing all of these warnings (and more!) and will continue to for as long as our servers are functioning.

But AO3 is only one of our many projects whose content our organization doesn't censor, and whose users rely on that promise of freedom of speech.

Fanhackers houses discussions on fannish non-fiction topics, and Transformative Works and Cultures is an academic journal dedicated entirely to fan culture studies. Both Fanhackers and TWC accept submissions from non-academics, and welcome a vast range of experiences and outlooks on fandom and fan traditions.

Meanwhile, Fanlore, our ever-growing repository of fan history, maintains a plural point of view policy on all its articles. After all, there is no "right" way to look at the history of fan cultures. All sides of a story are valid, and fans are given a space to "tell their own stories from their own perspective," as stated in Fanlore's Plural Point of View policy page.

You are the creators, and we respect your right to make your works the way you choose to make them. We’ve been around for seven censorship-free years and were hoping to raise US$70,000 this week. Fandom has come through for us in only two days! With four more days to go in our drive, how far will you all push our donation meter? With your support, we can keep the OTW’s projects independent and censorship-free.

We would also like to let AO3 users who are still receiving our emails for the drive know that these will continue to be sent until Friday, October 24th. As our account holder list has become quite large, it takes several days once the email process begins for everyone to receive the email. We began this process late Sunday so some of the information is now out of date -- our apologies!

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Posted by Arturo

By Arturo R. García

Well now this is interesting.

As Variety reported on Tuesday, the demand for a new Static Shock revival will finally be met, in perhaps the most unexpected of fashions: an online-only live-action series.

It’s also encouraging to see the revival of Milestone Entertainment’s signature character is being led by Milestone alumni: Film and comics veteran Reginald Hudlin will be the executive producer, in collaboration with Denys Cowan, who produced the much-missed animated series that Warner Brothers stubbornly left by the wayside years ago.

Cover to first Static Shock TPB, “Rebirth Of The Cool,” from Milestone Entertainment.

Pushing Static into the digital realm through its new Blue Ribbon Content imprint could help DC Entertainment in its bid to keep up with archrivals Marvel in that arena; the comics division has won popular and commercial praise for offering Smallville, Batman ’66 and the upcoming Wonder Woman ’77 as online exclusives.

The upside might be more than even DC anticipates: Static now has the benefit of returning to television after literally years of fans and critics (including this site) denouncing the company for letting him languish in the name of feeding executives’ apparent love for Silver Age white heroes.

This new incarnation is also arriving at a moment when the Black audience is growing online; according to Interactive One, that audience has grown by 30 percent since 2011 to an estimated 23 million viewers. Comparatively, the white online audience has only grown by 8 percent during the same span.

But as is the case with Cyborg, DC must now consider how to take advantage of Static’s new presence in its comics. Currently, the character is supposed to be featured in upcoming issues of Teen Titans. But it’s going to be hard for longtime fans to forgive how badly the company botched its relaunch as part of the New 52 era, in a short-lived run that “featured” original writer John Rozum, another Milestone alumnus, essentially get turfed out:

From the first issue on, I was essentially benched by Harvey Richards and artist/writer Scott McDaniel. All of my ideas and suggestions were met with disdain, and Scott McDaniel lectured me on how my method for writing was wrong because it wasn’t what the Robert McKee screenwriting book he read told him was the way to do things. The man who’d never written anything was suddenly more expert than me and the editor was agreeing with him. Scott had also never read a Static comic book, nor seen the cartoon series, yet was telling me that my dialogue didn’t sound true to the character and would “fix it.”

There was more concern about seeing that the title sold and didn’t get cancelled than there was in telling good stories and having something coherent to bring readers in. This is what led Harvey to insist on the stuff with the two Sharon’s and cutting off Static’s arm. He had no answers for how to resolve these things, but thought it would keep reader’s wowed enough to stick with the series. This, too, was frustrating. It was a lot of grasping at straws and trying to second guess what would keep it selling. It was decided that “bigger action” on every page of every issue was the key.

Static’s alter ego, Virgil, who was more important to the original series than his super hero persona, was put on the very back burner because Harvey said it wasn’t important and that the book just needed to be all action. One of my scripts was deemed too slow because there were a total of 4 pages where no one was hitting or shooting anything.

There’s little reason to believe that Cowan and Hudlin won’t want to avoid this kind of creative debacle. Nor should we doubt that they’ve considered the tremendous upside Static stands to give DC. The big question, as always, is whether a company that complained nobody would buy his action figures is willing to let them develop and deliver on that promise.

The post Re-Re-Birth Of The Cool: Static Shock Gets A Shocking Online Revival appeared first on Racialicious - the intersection of race and pop culture.

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October 22nd, 2014next

October 22nd, 2014: GETTING SO EXCITED FOR HALLOWE'EN, you guys. I carved a pumpkin! I called my carving, "Um, Actually, The Constitution-Class Enterprise Never Canonically Encountered The Collective".

– Ryan

Two more nights

Oct. 21st, 2014 04:59 pm
yvi: Daniel Jackson, text:"Fearless" (Stargate - Fearless Daniel)
[personal profile] yvi
The holiday is close to over. I am currently at the Grand Canyon, tomorrow we'll drive to Las Vegas and leave for the airport in the morning. Hopefully, Condor will not continue its strike...

Seattle and San Francisco were great, Redwood was stunning, as were Kings Canyon/Sequoia and Joshua Tree. The Red Rock Canyon State Park was really nice, especially for such a small area.

I must say, though, that I was underwhelmed by both Yosemite and the Grand Canyon. Both were very "touristy" and with Yosemite we could really only see the Valley, which is stunning, but somehow my expectations were really high. And the Grand Canyon is beautiful and stunning and spectacular, but unless you can actually hike down it sort of feels like viewing a pretty picture, maybe? And way, way too touristy. We hiked a bit and that was nice, but nothing compared to hiking at Redwood or Joshua Tree.

Is this completely strange? Am I the only person not spiritually transformed by seeing the Grand Canyon?
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Posted by Latoya Peterson

“Color is not a human or a personal reality, it is a political reality.” – James Baldwin

This is not a book review, because Who We Be isn’t really a book. It’s more of a thoughtful examination of how the United States arrived at this point in racial history.

Long time friend of the blog Jeff Chang is the author of the American Book award winning Can’t Stop, Won’t Stop: A History of the Hip Hop Generation and editor of the anthology Total Chaos: The Art and Aesthetics of Hip Hop. To say we’ve been waiting for Who We Be is an understatement.

But in the introduction, Chang frames the core of the most recent case of racial backlash. Explaining the outsized reaction by some whites to President Obama, Chang notes:

In the 1830s white minstrels had put on blackface, creating space for the white working class to challenge the elite, while keeping Blacks locked into their racial place. Obama now appeared as a dual symbol of oppression. Because of his Blackness, he was even more of an outsider—and in that sense, even more American—than them. But he was also the president. His Blackness did not just confer moral and existential claims, it was backed by the power of the state.

And there went everything.

As much as we like to talk about the inevitability of America being majority-minority in 2042, the events playing out across the nation show that most places are outright hostile to the idea that people of color are equal Americans, with the same rights, privileges, representation, and agenda setting power bestowed to whites. Chang turns his critical eye to shifts in culture which becomes documentation of rise (and fall?) of multiculturalism.

The opening chapter is on the funny pages and American comic culture acting as a barometer for race relations. Chang finds amazing gems – Morrie Turner’s Wee Pals frames the narrative since Turner was the first black syndicated cartoonist, but we also hear about the work of Jackie Ormes, Gus Arriola, Barbara Brandon-Croft, Ray Billingsley, George Harriman, Robb Armstrong, and Oliver Harrington.

Chang also points to the variety of issues at play in cartoons like the friendly Sambo model that led to popular characters like Felix the Cat, Mickey Mouse, and Bugs Bunny. Racism was even in the inking -comics used three colors: black, white, and the pinkish “flesh” tone. Anyone who did not conform became odd tones of purple. The modern world of comics hasn’t improved much – even with established cartoonists like Lalo Alcaraz and Keith Knight doing their thing, the Sunday comics pages have stubbornly resisted full integration.

From comics, Chang moves to art and the marketing of identity. Then on to politics, culture,The DREAMers, politics, war, neoliberalism, capitalism Occupy Wall Street and more in a bid to make racial sense of the country’s political mood.

While reading, one could wonder if society learned anything from the past 40 years? Or has polite society only learned to spout the “correct” answers? Later in the book, Chang discusses the phenomenon of people saying they want diversity, but seeing the reality play out in one of the biggest areas of segregation in America – housing:

How much did Americans value diversity and integration? Over the course of four decades, the Gallup survey had asked whites, “Would you move if great numbers of Blacks moved into your neighborhood?” In 1958, 79% said they would. In 1997, 75% said they would not. A month after Obama’s victory, a report from the Pew Research Center showed that almost 2 in 3 Americans—including 52% of Republicans, 60% of whites, 83% of Blacks, and 76% of 18-29 year olds—said that they preferred to live in a community made up of people who were a mix of different races. The numbers were similar for religious, political, and socioeconomic diversity.

Fully 68% of those making $100,000 or more a year—a significantly larger proportion than every other income bracket—said they preferred to live in a community with a mix of economic classes. But when Stanford professors Sean F. Reardon and Kendra Bischoff examined the data from 1970 to 2009, they found that not only had residential segregation by income soared, the wealthy had segregated themselves the fastest.

Large majorities told pollsters they wanted integrated schools and diversity in education. Pundits and politicians would often trot out such these polls as cause for optimism around racial justice issues. But in light of the actual social facts, the survey data looked less like an emerging consensus for cultural equity than evidence that multiculturalism had made some better primed to answer the questions “correctly.” For in this colorized generation, public schools were resegregating at a dramatic rate.

By 2010, 80% of Latinos and 74% of Blacks attended majority non-white schools. Around 40% of Blacks and Latinos in public schools attended hypersegregated schools in which 90-100% of the students were nonwhite. Blacks and Latinos were also twice as likely to attend a school predominantly serving low-income students than white or Asian students. White students were the most racially isolated of all—the average white student attended a school that was 75% white.

Resegregation did not escape even the rapidly diversifying suburbs or the most liberal strongholds. From city to exurb, the San Francisco Bay Area— one of the nation’s most diverse regions, the birthplace of the multiculturalism movement, and the site of Berkeley’s national model public school desegregation program—also boasted California’s highest rates of White isolation. Although white students made up only 28% of the Bay Area’s student-age population, 65% of them attended majority white schools. Those schools were eight times less likely than predominantly non-white ones to be deemed “high-problem” schools.

After 1968, busing, court orders, and district plans had helped to integrate the schools from the deep South to the Northwest. In turn school desegregation climbed sharply and peaked in the late 1980s. But then conservative challenges to desegregation mounted, and anti-integrationists began to accumulate victories in the courts and the legislatures. During the 1990s, while multiculturalists were winning the battle to change school curriculum and staffing, they were losing the battle to desegregate the next generation of public school students. By the new millennium, the same southern school systems that had made the most progress toward integration were the fastest to resegregate. Progress had always been fragile.

The book ends on equal parts heartbreak and hope, juxtaposing a few different stories to paint a picture of where we are.

The ambiguous ending fits the overall theme of the book – after all, isn’t that what we go through as people of color everyday?

Ultimately, Who We Be can feel a little disjointed – condensing America’s entire racial history in imagery is a major feat, and the book is much better at raising ideas and questions than providing concrete answers. But anyone who cares about racial equity should read this book – if for nothing else than to supply the foundation for our action.

Racialicious is giving away a copy of Who We Be. To enter, leave a comment addressing this question: “What does multiculturalism mean now and what needs to happen next?”

The post Who We Be Examines the War on Multiculuralism appeared first on Racialicious - the intersection of race and pop culture.

Ad-Free

Oct. 21st, 2014 04:23 pm
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Posted by Claudia Rebaza

English

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It's that time of year again. You see the banners, you read the posts — but why is the OTW asking for money? Well, one of the many reasons that the Organization for Transformative Works is awesome is that we don’t have any advertising, which is why we rely on your support.

When visiting any of our websites, you don't have to worry about having a fanwork or article squeezed into a corner of your screen by advertising or accidentally clicking on an advert. The OTW and its projects are free of any advertising.

The reasons the OTW does not accept any advertising tie into some of the founding principles of the Organization itself.

In a presentation for the Nine Worlds convention in August 2013, OTW staffer Lucy Pearson described some of these principles: "The reason the OTW was formed really had to do with the fundamental lack of security that fans have when they rely on commercial platforms to host their work... Any site that's for profit and dependent on advertisers is very rarely going to stick its neck out for users in the face of advertiser pressure."

Many of us have, over the years, seen beloved works disappear in purges. With the OTW, there is no pressure from anyone to remove content to be more attractive to advertisers. This allows the OTW to give our undivided loyalty to our users.

While not having advertising is brilliant, it means that we need your help to function and maintain our awesomeness. Your donation of US$10 or more allows the OTW to continue to provide you with the ad-free sites that you know and love. Help preserve our freedom and our works! Please donate today. The goal of this fundraiser is to raise $70,000 for the OTW. We are well on our way! Please help us meet our goal today.

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Posted by Arturo

By Arturo R. García

DC Entertainment scored a rare PR victory over archrival Marvel over the weekend when it announced its upcoming slate of films. At first glance, this latest take on the DC movie universe instantly puts Marvel’s to shame when it comes to inclusion.

But besides the far-flung timetable involved, it very much remains to be seen whether the company is willing to put in the work to elevate its non-white heroes to a position befitting their upcoming roles on the big screen.

Here’s how the schedule looks, courtesy of Slate:

Not only does this signal the long-awaited arrival of Wonder Woman in her own solo feature, but the Flash movie will be led by a queer actor in Ezra Miller. And that’s before getting to the two POC leads in Jason Momoa’s Aquaman and, perhaps more surprisingly, Ray Fisher starring as Cyborg.

Ray Fisher (right) will play Cyborg for DC Entertainment. image via wn.com

If you’ve never heard of Fisher, don’t be surprised; according to IMDB, his appearance in Batman v. Superman: Dawn of Justice will constitute his first major on-screen role. No pressure, right?

But look at the timeline again. Throw in Dwayne “The Rock” Johnson appearing in Shazam, and it’s likely that POC will not be prominent in a DCE film for at least three years. The X-factor here is Suicide Squad, which appears to be on the fast track and should by all rights include Amanda Waller. Even if it means the “sexy” version unveiled three years ago as part of the company’s comics relaunch.

A cynical observer might point out that waiting until 2018 for an Aquaman film starring Momoa and Fisher’s starring role two years(!) later gives DC enough time to scuttle their plans if Dawn of Justice is as much of a disappointment as Man of Steel. Or that Aquaman and Cyborg’s position in the movie pipeline reflects their standing within the Justice League. They’re such valued members that the Suicide Squad got the nod first, and Cyborg has to wait for two Justice League movies before getting his shot. A cynic might argue that the only reason Cyborg isn’t dead last is because Ryan Reynolds’ turn as Hal Jordan was enough of a flop that the Green Lantern movie brand still hasn’t recovered.

Cyborg in the “Super Powers Team: Galactic Guardians” cartoon. Image via DC Wikia.

On the bright side, DC now has no excuse to decisively elevate Cyborg into the top tier of its roster, even if most sensible fans wish John Stewart were getting that same treatment. It’s important to remember, first of all, that Victor Stone’s inclusion in the Justice League’s “New 52″ comics roster isn’t without precedent; in 1985, the character was featured on the Super Powers Team: Galactic Guardians animated series, the final incarnation of the venerable SuperFriends franchise.

Cyborg on the cover of “Tales of the New Teen Titans” #1, as published in June 1982. Image via Wikipedia.

Then, as now, Cyborg was the junior member of the team — the POV character for the audience and the team’s designated IT person. Which probably seemed fine to casual viewers, but was in fact a reduction of his much larger role in DC’s hottest property of that time, the Teen Titans comic. As conceived by Marv Wolfman and George Perez, the Victor Stone of the ’80s had the benefit of a full journey from being horrified at his condition to eventually leading the team and forging a new family relationship with them.

But just as John Stewart went from a stalwart hero to one with a higher profile thanks to the Justice League and Justice League Unlimited series, another version of the Titans brand put Cyborg in the public eye:

Cyborg in the “Teen Titans Go!” animated series. Image via Fanpop.com.

It’s very possible that, to non-comics fans, their image of Cyborg is of the high-appetite, high-energy version from Teen Titans Go!. A funny guy, sure, but maybe not the kind of hero that’s going to fill up a multiplex. If DC is serious about making the character the next great POC movie superhero, we’d like to argue that the company needs to split the difference: show his traumatic origin, sure, but take him beyond the JLA’s sidekick and let his film reach for the afrofuturistic heights he’s perfectly positioned to reach. A movie-going public living in an increasingly tech-reliant world could really get behind a hero who can plumb the depths of the grid from anywhere in the physical world. If DC wants to end its “phase one” with a bang, it needs to stop treating Cyborg like the last one in line, and understand that for this position in pop culture, he’s the first of his kind.

The post On DC Entertainment, Cyborg, And Going Back To The Afrofuture appeared first on Racialicious - the intersection of race and pop culture.

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October 21st, 2014next

October 21st, 2014: This "bodies as machines that turn food into ideas" idea was actually well-established way back in 2005 on this here website! T-Rex has considered it and has further OPINIONS on the matter, almost a decade later. :0

– Ryan

Made in Fandom

Oct. 20th, 2014 04:11 pm
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Posted by Claudia Rebaza

English

Banner with seven circles and a price tag in the second one, reading 'Seven Years, Seven Wonders, Organization for Transformative Works, October 19-26 2014 Membership Drive'

Do you remember the first moment you searched the internet for that thing you loved and found out there was a fandom for it? The first time you picked up a fanzine, or saw an amazing piece of fanart for that ship you didn't even know you needed? So do we! The OTW was built entirely by fans — fans who wanted to hold onto that spark of fannish wonder, share it with others, and make sure it would never go out.

Here in the OTW, fandom is our fandom. There's nothing we celebrate more than fans themselves, and fandom in all its forms. We do what we do out of love — and there's nothing more rewarding than to see the Organization and its projects flourishing, growing exponentially every year.

With growth comes a lot of hard work. The OTW is run entirely by volunteers: over 500 fans worldwide donate their time to bring our projects to you, to preserve and document fanworks and fan culture, and to keep the organization up and running. From coders to wranglers, translators to lawyers, directors to academics — each of us dedicates countless hours every month to this passion. The AO3 alone has a huge codebase, which took an estimated effort of 22 person-years to build — this would amount to over US$1 million in salaries according to open source tracker Openhub! The infographic below can give you some idea of the work that goes into keeping the OTW and its projects together.

2014 By the Numbers: 283 bugs fixed and features implemented at AO3, 1,868 AO3 Abuse reports submitted, and 98% resolved, 4,370 tickets sent to AO3 Support with 97% resolved, 7,756 works preserved on AO3 by Open Doors, 20 surveys deployed by Strategic Planning to help plot our course for the next 3 years, 260 issues resolved by Systems while maintaining OTW's infrastructure, 16,173 fandoms managed by 171 tag wranglers, 202 new staff and volunteers added making 527 volunteers total, 108 issues reported and fixed on transformativeworks.org, 671,894 words translated by our translation volunteers into 19 languages

To keep on doing all this work and grow even more, we need your help! The OTW depends on your donations, so please consider supporting us with a donation of US$10 or more. Our goal for this drive is US$70,000 to celebrate the OTW's 7 years of existence. Please help us meet this goal today!

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Posted by Latoya Peterson

Originally published at Grantmakers in the Arts

The rules of the Long Table.

The rules of the Long Table.

Can a conversation about race be a performance? What does that simple framework shift do to the conversation? The answer: everything.

The long table conversation is a fascinating thing to watch unfold. Participants come in and out as they please. There is snacking and scribbling, mostly on topic. Some people were determined watchers, setting up camp on the chairs on the far edge of the perimeter. And others eagerly queued up in the seats closest to the table, waiting for the moment they could tap someone on the shoulder, sending that performer out and putting themselves into the conversation.

The Long Table - The Beginning

The Long Table – The Beginning

The conversation starts off immediately. There aren’t really any awkward pauses. The presence of the table as a speaking space created a flow that participants respected. I wondered if an art project gave people license to break the rules and conventions of conversation. I felt inspired to draw a circle around an errant blueberry on the table. And at times, I felt the urge to run around, to lean over someone and circle their scribble, to interact out of order and out of place. After all, isn’t that art? Responding to stimuli?

But that will have to wait for another long table. People needed this space – stories flowed alongside tears and while this may have been intended as an art project the space morphed to accommodate mass catharsis.

Defining racial equity.

Defining racial equity.

Race Scrawl.

Race Scrawl.

Screen Shot 2014-10-15 at 11.01.58 AM

(TRA is an abbreviation for transracial adoptee.)

Racial Scrawl 2

Racial Scrawl 2

The session draws to a close. Many are in tears. Some feel a profound shift. Others looked at the way inequality replicated itself at the table. There is no solution. But in art, does there need to be a neat resolution?

The post #GIA14: Racial Conversation as Performance Art appeared first on Racialicious - the intersection of race and pop culture.

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Posted by Arturo

By Arturo R. García

The final day of the Comic Fest opened with one of the most far-ranging topics in speculative fiction in Afrofuturism. And true to form, the speakers reached into the past and toward the future in discussing not only their interpretation of the concept, but how it has influenced their fandom and their work.

Top image: A still from the trailer for “The Crypto-Historians,” which can be seen below.

The post Live From San Diego Comic Fest: The Afrofuturism Panel appeared first on Racialicious - the intersection of race and pop culture.

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Posted by Arturo

By Arturo R. García

Over the weekend I went to the third annual San Diego Comic Fest, which has pointedly positioned itself as the anti-Comic Con.

Specifically, the size of the event is kept manageable for vendors, presenters and attendees alike; no conference room holds more than 40 or 50 people at one time, allowing for a more relaxed atmosphere and easier conversations between panelists and their audiences.

One end result is, panels focusing on diversity don’t feel as lost in the shuffle. And the Latino Comics panel covered not only industry trends within Latin America, but the rapidly-evolving effects of Latinidad on the U.S.’ identity.

[Top image via "The Condor and The Eagle: A Pilgrimage to Machu Picchu" official Facebook page]

The post Live From San Diego Comic Fest: Latino Comics appeared first on Racialicious - the intersection of race and pop culture.

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October 20th, 2014next

October 20th, 2014: Happy birthday to everyone who was born on a previous iteration of this day in the past!! Did you know: the set of these people includes ME

PS: OMG, THIS PETITION EXISTS

– Ryan

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